Session:「Experiences with Virtual Reality」

ShareVR: Enabling Co-Located Experiences for Virtual Reality between HMD and Non-HMD Users

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3025683

論文アブストラクト: Virtual reality (VR) head-mounted displays (HMD) allow for a highly immersive experience and are currently becoming part of the living room entertainment. Current VR systems focus mainly on increasing the immersion and enjoyment for the user wearing the HMD (HMD user), resulting in all the bystanders (Non-HMD users) being excluded from the experience. We propose ShareVR, a proof-of-concept prototype using floor projection and mobile displays in combination with positional tracking to visualize the virtual world for the Non-HMD user, enabling them to interact with the HMD user and become part of the VR experience. We designed and implemented ShareVR based on the insights of an initial online survey (n=48) with early adopters of VR HMDs. We ran a user study (n=16) comparing ShareVRto a baseline condition showing how the interaction using ShareVR led to an increase of enjoyment, presence and social interaction. In a last step we implemented several experiences for ShareVR, exploring its design space and giving insights for designers of co-located asymmetric VR experiences.

日本語のまとめ:

HMDを着けていなくても、その場にいる全ユーザが一緒に楽しめるShareVRを提案した。ShareVRでは、全ユーザにVR空間を見せるためモバイルディスプレイとフロアプロジェクションを用いる。ベースラインとの比較の結果、プレゼンスとソーシャルインタラクション、楽しさが向上された。

CarVR: Enabling In-Car Virtual Reality Entertainment

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3025665

論文アブストラクト: Mobile virtual reality (VR) head-mounted displays (HMDs) allow users to experience highly immersive entertainment whilst being in a mobile scenario. Long commute times make casual gaming in public transports and cars a common occupation. However, VR HMDs can currently not be used in moving vehicles since the car's rotation affects the HMD's sensors and simulator sickness occurs when the visual and vestibular system are stimulated with incongruent information. We present CarVR, a solution to enable VR in moving vehicles by subtracting the car's rotation and mapping vehicular movements with the visual information. This allows the user to actually feel correct kinesthetic forces during the VR experience. In a user study (n = 21), we compared CarVR inside a moving vehicle with the baseline of using VR without vehicle movements. We show that the perceived kinesthetic forces caused by CarVR increase enjoyment and immersion significantly while simulator sickness is reduced compared to a stationary VR experience. Finally, we explore the design space of in-car VR entertainment applications using real kinesthetic forces and derive design considerations for practitioners.

日本語のまとめ:

車両で移動中でも利用できる同乗者用のVRコンテンツの提案。車につけたセンサ情報を基に、車体の動きとVR内の動きを連動させることでVR空間に合った遠心力を感じられる。実験結果により、VR酔いの軽減と楽しさ、プレゼンスの向上が確認された。

Effects of Sharing Physiological States of Players in a Collaborative Virtual Reality Gameplay

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3026028

論文アブストラクト: Interfaces for collaborative tasks, such as multiplayer games can enable more effective and enjoyable collaboration. However, in these systems, the emotional states of the users are often not communicated properly due to their remoteness from one another. In this paper, we investigate the effects of showing emotional states of one collaborator to the other during an immersive Virtual Reality (VR) gameplay experience. We created two collaborative immersive VR games that display the real-time heart-rate of one player to the other. The two different games elicited different emotions, one joyous and the other scary. We tested the effects of visualizing heart-rate feedback in comparison with conditions where such a feedback was absent. The games had significant main effects on the overall emotional experience.

日本語のまとめ:

2種類の協調VRゲームを通して、他プレイヤーの心理状態の提示による体験内容やプレイヤー間の関係性への影響を調査した。心理状態は心拍数をハートの伸縮として提示。調査の結果、体験内容への影響はポジティブな傾向がみられた。

VRRRRoom: Virtual Reality for Radiologists in the Reading Room

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3025566

論文アブストラクト: Reading room conditions such as illumination, ambient light, human factors and display luminance, play an important role on how radiologists analyze and interpret images. Indeed, serious diagnostic errors can appear when observing images through everyday monitors. Typically, these occur whenever professionals are ill-positioned with respect to the display or visualize images under improper light and luminance conditions. In this work, we show that virtual reality can assist radiodiagnostics by considerably diminishing or cancel out the effects of unsuitable ambient conditions. Our approach combines immersive head-mounted displays with interactive surfaces to support professional radiologists in analyzing medical images and formulating diagnostics. We evaluated our prototype with two senior medical doctors and four seasoned radiology fellows. Results indicate that our approach constitutes a viable, flexible, portable and cost-efficient option to traditional radiology reading rooms.

日本語のまとめ:

MRI等を扱う放射線医師の画像診断を支援するVRシステムを提案した。誤診断の原因要素を排除した空間にイメージを表示、タッチパネル操作でイメージの調節が可能。医療専門家の使用感として、好意的な意見が多かったがいくつか課題も指摘された。

Handsfree Omnidirectional VR Navigation using Head Tilt

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3025521

論文アブストラクト: Navigating mobile virtual reality (VR) is a challenge due to limited input options and/or a requirement for handsfree interaction. Walking-in-place (WIP) is considered to offer a higher presence than controller input but only allows unidirectional navigation in the direction of the user's gaze--which impedes navigation efficiency. Leaning input enables omnidirectional navigation but currently relies on bulky controllers, which aren't feasible in mobile VR contexts. This note evaluates the use of head-tilt - implemented using inertial sensing - to allow for handsfree omnidirectional VR navigation on mobile VR platforms. A user study with 24 subjects compared three input methods using an obstacle avoidance navigation task: (1) head-tilt alone (TILT) (2) a hybrid method (WIP-TILT) that uses head tilting for direction and WIP to control speed; and (3) traditional controller input. TILT was significantly faster than WIP-TILT and joystick input, while WIP-TILT and TILT offered the highest presence. There was no difference in cybersickness between input methods.

日本語のまとめ:

VRの移動方法として、従来は視線方向にしか進めなかった足踏み移動方式(WIP)を拡張、頭の傾き方向を進む方向にしたWIP-TILTと実装した。実験では高いプレゼンスを維持しつつ、ジョイスティックと同等の操作パフォーマンスを発揮された。