Session:「Technology Enabled Commerce」

Market Design for HCI: Successes and Failures of Peer-to-Peer Exchange Platforms

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3025515

論文アブストラクト: This paper explores an HCI approach to designing markets, with a primary focus on peer-to peer exchange platforms. We draw on recent work in economics that has documented how markets function, how they can be evaluated, and what can be done to fix them when they fail. We introduce five key concepts from market design: thickness, congestion, stability, safety, and repugnance. These lend HCI an analytic vocabulary for understanding why markets may succeed or struggle. Building on prior empirical work, we apply these concepts to compare two well-known network hospitality platforms, Couchsurfing and Airbnb. As a second illustrative case, we use market design to shed light on the challenges experienced by smaller-scale peer-to-peer marketplaces for lending, renting, and selling physical goods. To conclude, we discuss how this kind of analysis can make conceptual, evaluative, and generative contributions to the study and design of exchange platforms and other socio-technical systems.

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Community Commerce: Facilitating Trust in Mom-to-Mom Sale Groups on Facebook

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3025550

論文アブストラクト: Consumers are turning to Facebook Groups to buy and sell with strangers in their local communities. This trend is counter-intuitive given Facebook's lack of conventional e-commerce features, such as sophisticated search engines and reputation systems. We interviewed 18 members of two Mom-to-Mom Facebook sale groups. Despite a lack of commerce tools, members perceived sale groups as an easy-to-use way to quickly and conveniently buy and sell. Most important to members was that the groups felt safe and trustworthy. Drawing on these insights, we contribute a novel framing, community commerce, which explains the trust mechanisms that enable transactions between strangers in some groups. Community commerce fosters trust through (a) exclusive membership to a closed group, (b) regulation and sanctioning of behavior at the admin, member, and group level, and (c) a shared group identity or perceived similarity (though, surprisingly, not through social bonding). We discuss how community commerce affords unique and sometimes superior trust assurances and propose design implications for platforms hoping to foster trust between members who buy, sell, or share amongst themselves.

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No Such Thing as Too Much Chocolate: Evidence Against Choice Overload in E-Commerce

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3025778

論文アブストラクト: E-commerce designers must decide how many products to display at one time. Choice overload research has demonstrated the surprising finding that more choice is not necessarily better?selecting from larger choice sets can be more cognitively demanding and can result in lower levels of choice satisfaction. This research tests the choice overload effect in an e-commerce context and explores how the choice overload effect is influenced by an individual's tendency to maximize or satisfice decisions. We conducted an online experiment with 611 participants randomly assigned to select a gourmet chocolate bar from either 12, 24, 40, 50, 60, or 72 different options. Consistent with prior work, we find that maximizers are less satisfied with their product choice than satisficers. However, using Bayesian analysis, we find that it's unlikely that choice set size affects choice satisfaction by much, if at all. We discuss why the decision-making process may be different in e-commerce contexts than the physical settings used in previous choice overload experiments.

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Why Users Disintermediate Peer-to-Peer Marketplaces

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3025453.3025815

論文アブストラクト: This paper reports on a study of the prevalence of and possible reasons for peer-to-peer transaction marketplace (P2PM) users turning to out-of-market (OOM) transactions after finding transaction partners within a P2P system. We surveyed 97 P2PM users and interviewed 22 of 58 who reported going OOM. We did not find any evidence of predisposing personality factors for OOM activity; instead, it seems to be a rational response to circumstances, with a variety of situationally rational motivations at play, such as liking the transaction partner and trusting that good quality repeat transactions will occur in the future.

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