Session:「Dealing with emerging technologies」

My Telepresence, My Culture?: An Intercultural Investigation of Telepresence Robot Operators' Interpersonal Distance Behaviors

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3173574.3173625

論文アブストラクト: Interpersonal distance behaviors can vary significantly across countries and impact human social interaction. Do these cross-cultural differences play out when one of the interaction partners participates through a teleoperated robot? Emerging research shows that when being approached by a robot, people tend to hold similar cultural preferences as they would for an approaching human. However, no work yet has investigated this question from a robot teleoperator's perspective. Toward answering this, we conducted an online study (N = 774) using a novel simulation paradigm across two countries (U.S. and India). Results show that in the role of a telepresence robot operator, participants exhibited cross-cultural differences in interpersonal distance behavior in line with human-human proxemic research, indicating that culture-specific distance behavior can manifest in the way a robot operator controls a robot. We discuss implications for designers who seek to automate path planning and navigation for teleoperated robots.

日本語のまとめ:

遠隔地の人間と対面している体験を提供する技術であるテレプレゼンスに国民性が現れるのかという問題に筆者らは着目し,テレプレゼンスロボットと人の距離を評価することで操縦者の文化的嗜好が操作に反映されることを示した.

What's at Stake: Characterizing Risk Perceptions of Emerging Technologies

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3173574.3173644

論文アブストラクト: One contributing factor to how people choose to use technology is their perceptions of associated risk. In order to explore this influence, we adapted a survey instrument from risk perception literature to assess mental models of users and technologists around risks of emerging, data-driven technologies (e.g., identity theft, personalized filter bubbles). We surveyed 175 individuals for comparative and individual assessments of risk, including characterizations using psychological factors. We report our observations around group differences (e.g., expert versus non-expert) in how people assess risk, and what factors may structure their conceptions of technological harm. Our findings suggest that technologists see these risks as posing a bigger threat to society than do non-experts. Moreover, across groups, participants did not see technological risks as voluntarily assumed. Differences in how people characterize risk have implications for the future of design, decision-making, and public communications, which we discuss through a lens we call risk-sensitive design.

日本語のまとめ:

技術発展に伴うリスクに対する技術者と非技術者間の意識の差異がどの程度現れるのかを調査した結果,技術者の方がリスクを脅威と捉えていた.筆者らは悪い設計によりリスクが生じると主張し,リスクを意識した設計の必要性を訴えている.

Knowing You, Seeing Me: Investigating User Preferences in Drone-Human Acknowledgement

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3173574.3173939

論文アブストラクト: In the past, human proxemics research has poorly predicted human robot interaction distances. This paper presents three studies on drone gestures to acknowledge human presence and clarify suitable acknowledging distances. We evaluated four drone gestures based on non-verbal human greetings. The gestures included orienting towards the counterpart and salutation gestures. We tested these individually and in combination to create a feeling of acknowledgement in people. Our users preferred being acknowledged from two meters away but gestures were also effective from four meters. Rotating the drone towards the user elicited a higher degree of acknowledgement than without. We conclude with a set design guidelines for drone gestures.

日本語のまとめ:

Human Drone Interaction(HDI)において①人が不快にならないドローンとの距離が2~4mであること②人を認識したことを明示するために人の方向を向く動作が適していること③デザインガイドが示された.

Is it Happy?: Behavioural and Narrative Frame Complexity Impact Perceptions of a Simple Furry Robot's Emotions

論文URL: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3173574.3174083

論文アブストラクト: Critical to social human-robot interaction is a robot's emotional richness, expressed within the parameters of its physical display. While emotion arousal is straightforward to convey, human valence (positivity) evaluations are famously ambiguous, whether we are assessing other humans or a robot. Imagine someone breathing raggedly: are they nervous, or excited? To assess the premise that irregular breathing connotes low valence (emotion negativity), we implemented different levels of breathing variability and complexity in simple furry robots. We asked 10 participants to watch and feel the behaviors, rate their valence, and explain their impressions. While a quantitative exploration of new and previous data showed correlation between multi-scale entropy and valence, the rich narratives revealed by thematic analysis of participant explanations call into question whether a single motion can, alone, be unambiguously valenced. Based on this evidence that people perceive robots as having inner lives, we recommend ways to build up narrative contexts over multiple interactions.

日本語のまとめ:

1自由度の動きを呼吸と見立てた毛皮ロボに対して与える信号の自己相似性とロボが抱くと考えられる感情に負の相関があると述べた. つまりロボの呼吸が複雑になればロボはnegativeな感情を持つと人間が想起できることを示した.